I’ve been absconded.

A sack was thrown over my head and I’ve been removed from my environs for two days which means today’s post will not be seen.
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Please do a rewind and glance over Wednesday’s post again, or spend the next 48 hours looking at this;
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Until then, then.
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6 Responses to “I’ve been absconded.”

  1. bRado June 17, 2011 at 8:37 am #

    Let’s do the Time Warp, Again…

  2. Trailer Park Cyclist June 17, 2011 at 10:26 am #

    Is that Herve’ Villachez?

  3. Teemac June 17, 2011 at 12:29 pm #

    Your pictures make me hate my life.

  4. Vaeringjar June 19, 2011 at 11:26 am #

    After dutifully staring at that psychedelic shit for 48 hours, the line “this post will not be seen” reminded me of Chris Burden’s hilarious 1971 art piece:
    YOU’LL NEVER SEE MY FACE IN KANSAS CITY November 6, 1971 Morgan Gallery, Kansas City, Missouri
    “For three hours I sat without moving behind a panel which concealed my neck and head. No one could see behind the panel; a piece of board sealed the underside of the space.”
    Then the fun part:
    “In conjunction with the performance, I wore a ski mask at all times during my stay in Kansas City from November 5-7, 1971.”

  5. Stevil June 19, 2011 at 12:47 pm #

    Vaeringjar,
    You’ve touched me with this comment. I discovered Burden when I was a young and impressionable seventeen year old still living in Evergreen, Colorado. The pieces where he crucified himself on the back of the Volkswagen Bug, and shot a handgun at a commercial airliner were two that spoke to me and my particular condition/situation.

  6. Vaeringjar June 19, 2011 at 2:39 pm #

    Stevil, I like touching people.
    17? Were you an early enrollee at the Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics or something? Far from being square, I still doubt I knew about Burden in my teens.
    I can hardly stand most current-day art, though I think Aliza Schvarts’ miscarriage project was up there with, to exaggerate and lamely try to meet the theme of this blog, Duchamp’s Bicycle Wheel.